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Research study for carers (family, friends etc.,) of people with MS


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KristyMartin

KristyMartin

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Whilst not all carers (family, friends etc., rather than employed carers) of people with MS experience low mood and stress as a result of their caring duties, research and clinical experience has shown that some carers do. Together, this is referred to as ‘carer strain’. Currently, there is no specific support available for carers in clinical practice. For any specific support to be made available through NHS services, research must show that the support that is provided is beneficial for carers of people with MS, and it should not cost too much. Carer strain and support has also been a topic identified by the MS Society as an important subject to focus on.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a talking therapy that has been found to be useful for people in distress. ACT teaches people to respond more effectively to difficult thoughts and feelings, so that they no longer are a barrier to living a full and enjoyable life. In the context of carer strain, ACT offers a range of strategies – including mindfulness techniques – that could help carers to better cope with their caring responsibilities and associated emotional demands. Our team has tested associated self-help versions of ACT on people with MS but not with carers of those with MS.

The study we are proposing will randomly allocate carers who are distressed to one of three groups: one group of carers will receive an ACT self-help book, one group will receive the ACT self-help book alongside telephone support from a trainee clinical psychologist, and a third group will continue with their usual treatment. The aim will be to compare the three groups 3 and 6 months after joining the study to see if there has been any reduction in carer strain. The study requires no face-to-face contact and can be completed entirely online/via telephone, designed to fit around the busy lives and schedules of carers!

The outcomes we feel might be of interest to carers are: carer strain, mood, and quality of life. We will also be looking at the cost-effectiveness of the ACT self-help to assess its applicability to the NHS.

The project will be carried out by Kristy-Jane Martin (Trainee Clinical Psychologist) as part of their doctoral training in Clinical Psychology. The project will be supervised by Prof. Roshan das Nair (Clinical Psychologist), Dr Nima Moghaddam (Clinical Psychologist and ACT specialist), and Dr Nikos Evangelou (MS Neurologist).

For more information please contact Kristy-Jane Martin at kristy.martin@nottingham.ac.uk or on 07721958994

Edited by KristyMartin, 23 June 2017 - 09:23 AM.



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