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Marina

The list of Medicines affected by no-deal Brexit

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Crappy
Marina

This is for information about some of the meds many people with MS may take.

 

“What is becoming clear in this extract from the UK’s supply chain of medicines is the sheer scale already affected by either physical shortages or price increases as a direct result of Brexit, currently expected at the end of October. The breadth of conditions the shortages these medicines apply to is very wide, covering all age groups and everything from birth control, diabetes and painkillers to antibiotics, Parkinson’s and cancer treatments.”

 

Screenshot-2019-09-24-at-09.32.35.png?fi
TRUEPUBLICA.ORG.UK

the UK's supply chain of medicines is already affected by physical shortages or price increases as a direct result of Brexit, expected at the end of October

 

Earlier, the Epilepsy Society, being as some of our meds are primarily for epilepsy, had posted this list:

 

brexit.png
WWW.EPILEPSYSOCIETY.ORG.UK

In August 2018, the Government asked pharmaceutical companies to ensure they have a minimum six week stockpile of prescription-only and pharmacy-only medicines in case of...

 


Marina

(belated DX in June '05, SPMS)

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Nick

On the face of it this information is somewhat alarming, three of the four medications I take are on the list, Baclofen, Pregabalin and Citilopram.

medicines that are,as we know, common to many MS patients.  However at this point I am not too alarmed. I can't believe that we are going to see this worst case scenario.  The whole Brexit debate is simply about regulations, a complex affair after all these years.  The reality of actually transporting stuff across borders in this day and age will (I hope) not see too much long term disruption.  I live in hope!  and am only too sorry to see us leave the EU


Just another Warrior...........

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Crappy
Marina

Baclofen is one I also take.

 

I could swear Clonazepam, Tegretol and Propranolol (which I take) and Gabapentin (which I don’t take) were on that first list when I posted it... maybe they’ve since edited it?

 

Ah, Clonazepam (albeit in liquid form) and Tegretol are listed on the (older) list on the Epilepsy Society’s site, as is Gabapentin.

 

The steroid Prednisolone is another important one, for RRMS’ers in relapse...

 

I have noticed one thing in recent months: that the expiry date on most (not all) of my 6 prescriptions are a lot shorter than they used to be, some only up to Jan 2020 when they might previously have been good for at least a year if not two; although I haven’t yet figured out why that may be.

 

Today, this was posted:

 

Screenshot-2019-10-05-at-09.19.47.png?fi
TRUEPUBLICA.ORG.UK

However, the problem of medicine shortages is now becoming a real issue so we have published the latest list direct from the pharmaceutical industry

 

Without going into the ins and outs of it, I fear the whole Brexit thing is far more complex than simply regulations, and that a No Deal Brexit will bring huge disruptions. Even with a deal, there’d be disruptions but not all of which may be immediately felt.

 

They used to say “a week in politics is a long time” - right now, it’s more like “an hour in politics is a long time”! With the way things are and the way they keep changing, who knows what the final outcome will be.

 


Marina

(belated DX in June '05, SPMS)

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Nick

Apparently referendum occur all the time in Switzerland, over here this rare event seems only to have caused one massive split. Whichever side of the fence you sit its apparent we shall all have to face disruption for a number of years.  The ridiculous thing about it is that IT IS only 'regulation'

Medicine is still produced it the same quantity in the same places as before,all that has happened is the paperwork will be different (and of course more of it) 

I am dreading any loss in the continuity of my prescriptions.  This will definitely have a very serious impact on my ability to function. There is however very little I can do to change the situation. In a past life I would have put it down to the will of the Gods. In this day and age I simply have to hope that a solution will be found to the whole fiasco!

A bit of topic but I needed to get that off my chest

 

Nick


Just another Warrior...........

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