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Marina

The Spoon Theory

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Crappy
Marina

This is about Lupus, but can apply to MS or any other such condition just as well, and is about how to try to describe to someone how it feels to be disabled and not as healthy as they are.

 

The Spoon Theory:

TheSpoonTheory.pdf

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Marina

(belated DX in June '05, SPMS)

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LalalaKirby

..... That really makes you think...

 

I think I'm lucky with my spoons, considering.


I'm such a geek when I draw in breath it's with pixels!

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Vegged Out
Shirl

Oh thank you for this little gem, Marina. I've read it now for the second or third time. Although I have had MS each time of reading, this one has rammed home an excellent analogy because my spoons have run right out onme.



Shirley  "one day at a time"

 

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SkattyBell

My spoons are low in number at the mo.... why I'm sat at home with my lap-top for company.

Hoping to build up my collection of spoons steadily

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Lindyloo

Wow.... This is really moving - I hope everyone here gets to read this..

 

Sometimes i feel really awkward trying to explain what its like.... My friend at work sighs when i say i cant go to work today - I know its coz she misses me not been there... coz i always make her laugh... and i am always joking about.... BUT she has not got a clue what 'its' like..... This is a perfect description.... and maybe if she reads this she might just understand.... I love the days when i have extra spoons :winkgrin:


LindyLoo xx

" This moment will pass " (Bono U2)

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Hezza

I agree that it's great LindyLoo. I read it not long after diagnosis and didn't quite get it, a few relapses later and it rang true for me. I sent it to my closest friends and they really, really got it. It touched one of them so much that she sent me a little silver spoon charm for my birthday - she said she wanted to remind me that she's always there for me no matter how many miles are between us. I was really moved by the gesture and the spoon is attached to purse so it comes everywhere with me.


Life is short. Eat dessert first. Jacques Torres

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Lindyloo

Awwww Cara thats so lovely.... I have a few friends and family i could give this to..and im sure it will give them a better understanding of it all.... I know i look well and i am always joking about and i suppose to people who dont know will never know unless I give them a copy of this..

 

How thoughtful of your friend sending you a wee spoon.... My sister n law's best friend has lupus and i think i will send it to her also.. bless her...

 

I have never seen anything like this before... i will be passing it onto the local ms therapy centre here in Sligo..

 

i hope this wonderful story goes on forever

 

I am off to watch the football ...and a cup of tea and a few ginger crunches MMmmm xx


LindyLoo xx

" This moment will pass " (Bono U2)

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SusieD

Yes, buttons are a no go area unless you can take it on or off without undoing them. And yet people still ask why I wear T shirts and jumpers all the time.

Spoons? Try it with

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Sharon

What a wonderful way to explain it.

 

I think I`ll show a few members of my family and friends this.

I have spent years hiding my pain, and not letting anyone know how bad I was really, but now I can`t hide it any longer, I`ve gotten so bad lately, that this will be good to make people realise how I feel now.

 

Sometimes it`s hard for people to know, when they can`t see a scar or bruise or any other such signs. I know my mum was shocked the first time she saw me with my walking stick. :welcome2:

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zara

I find it very difficult to explain things. Especially when my symptoms first started, I was feeling things which sounded bizzare and made up when I'd explain them. i even asked my doctor to remember I'm a normal person when I went to see him!

 

Thank you for the spoon theory, I may use it with some friends and family

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scovas
This is about Lupus, but can apply to MS or any other such condition just as well, and is about how to try to describe to someone how it feels to be disabled and not as healthy as they are.

 

The Spoon Theory:

TheSpoonTheory.pdf

 

Beautiful. What a wonderful idea to explain to the world what it is to be... just a little different :)


Sofia

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Trude

This is such a good way to explain, it has really made me think, having just had an initial episode I had not quite got into the space where I fully appreciate how many "spoons" I have at the moment and how important it is to use them wisely. Thanks x


Trudy x

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pigeon64

I think I am reaping in a few mislaid spoons right now. A good read.

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Cllev

Just read this & it makes complete sense, I've forwarded it to a friend who has M.E too, it's a good way to explain it to people!

 

Can't wait to see the look on my bosses face when i turn around & say 'Sorry, not today, bit short on spoons!' :lol4:

 

Am going to send a copy to my boyfriend too, he's very understanding & I hope he realises that by me trying to do more (brute force & ignorance are my best friends) that i'm giving up doing other things to try & prove myself.

 

Cx

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Tired
PaulX

It is as good as anything I have seen in explaining what it is like to someone who doesn't have any chronic condition.

 

Perhaps it should be added that just because you don't use all your spoons one day, you don't get to use the surplus the next day, you just get your daily allocation, what ever that may be for any given day.


We're just two lost souls swimming in a fish bowl, year after year,

Running over the same old ground.

What have we found?

The same old fears.

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Dave Andrew

The spoon theory has helped me explain to people that didn't really 'get MS' ever since I first heard of it, and I am constantly surprised when those that I have told about the spoon theory spot the first signs and tell me to stop 'cos I'm running low on spoons'

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trish44

I gave this to my hubby recently as realised he wasnt 'getting it' when it came to my MS

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MadPete

There are never enough spoons

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Hanoge

I have never seen this before, but it is such a clear way of explaining something that I have found defies explanation, It is genius!!!! - there are so many people especially those that I work with that may understand better after reading this. Actually, I could do with reading this on a regular basis myself. I tend to just go at things like a bull at a gate and forget that I dont always have as many spoons as I used to have. I end up grinding to a halt and having to ask for help as I have run out of steam. I see that this was posted a while ago, but it is really appreciated. xx

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